Sanofi Canada has introduced Allerject, which it called the first and only "talking" epinephrine auto-injector in Canada, as a new option for the emergency treatment of anaphylaxis.


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Sanofi Canada unveils 'talking' auto-injector for anaphylaxis

January 21st, 2013

VANCOUVER, British Columbia – Sanofi Canada has introduced Allerject, which it called the first and only "talking" epinephrine auto-injector in Canada, as a new option for the emergency treatment of anaphylaxis.

The company said Monday that Allerject, making its debut in Vancouver, addresses a critical issue in treating anaphylaxis, a sudden, severe and possibly lethal allergic reaction: Many patients don't know how to correctly use an auto-injector.

Allerject comes equipped with automated voice instructions (in English or French) that guide users step-by-step through the injection process in the event of an emergency. The auto-injector, too, features a compact form factor — the shape of a credit card and the thickness of a cell phone — that makes it easy for people at increased risk for anaphylaxis to carry and have available at all times.

In addition, Allerject has a light that signals when the injection is complete, a retractable needle system so patients never see the needle, and a press-and-hold injection method, with the automated voice counting down the five seconds of injection time.

"Sanofi is excited about being able to offer Allerject," commented Jon Fairest, president and chief executive officer of Sanofi Canada. "Allerject is designed to address unmet patient needs and make a positive difference in the lives of those at risk of a severe allergic reaction, and those who care for them."

The company added that Allerject was developed by patients, for patients. The product's inventors — twin brothers Eric and Evan Edwards — are severely allergic to certain foods.

"We're patients, too," Eric Edwards stated, "and we wanted an auto-injector that would address gaps in the care of individuals at risk of anaphylaxis."

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